How to Combat Child Trafficking under the “New Normal”?

 

Written by Edward Lai (Senior Communication Officer)

 

As the pandemic is raging around the world, criminals do not only “hunt” civilians in a hidden way in poor villages, they also target their prey via the internet. By using their poor and fragile situation, they can easily force or lure the victims to work in sex industry, or engage in forced labour or any work that is obviously not commensurate with pay. Facing the “new normal” under the pandemic, Aashima Samuel, EFIC@R’s National Director, who has been engaged in anti-child trafficking for many years, shared her team’s coping strategies.

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Listen to the Cries of the Oppressed

 

Written by Tony Chan (Senior Partnership Development Officer)

 

“During that long period, the king of Egypt died. The Israelites groaned in their slavery and cried out, and their cry for help because of their slavery went up to God.” (Exodus 2:23)

 

The old Pharaoh promised to the prime minister Joseph that Joseph would take his father’s family to live in Egypt and live in the “best part of the land” (Genesis 47:6), the region of Goshen. Jacob, the ancestor of the Israelites, was able to reunite with his son Joseph and escape the famine with his family, so he seized the opportunity and moved to Egypt with his family of 70 members. Over the years, Jacob’s family and his offspring lived in Goshen, where they led a prosperous life and increased in numbers. However, the promise of the Egyptian authority did not extend to the new king. Many years later, the pharaoh did not like these foreigners and treated them badly.

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Hidden Crisis in the Pandemic: Human Trafficking

Editor’s note: The COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong is still unsettled and the labour market has been severely damaged. When the local situation worries us deeply, we are even more worried about the situation of the poor in developing countries. Not only do they face the risk of infection, they also suffer from losing their livelihoods and food shortage due to the pandemic. In order to survive, they desperately find a way out, and they are more likely to fall into the prey of human traffickers.

 

This issue of SHARE will talk about the more rampant human trafficking problem under the pandemic, especially the situation of poor children who are the most vulnerable to the influence of online fraud (“Focus”). Also we will share how our partner has responded to the “new normal” and continued in rescuing work under the pandemic (“Blessings by Offering”), and mobilised the church and community to fight against child trafficking (“Learn a Little More”). May the Lord who laments with us, encourages us to hear and respond to the needs of the exploited and trafficked (“Back to the Bible”).

 

[“SHARE” OCT – DEC 2020 ] FOCUS

Written by: Clara Chiu (Head of Partnership Development)

 

 

From July 20th to 23rd this year, several CEDAR staff participated in the “Asia Region Anti-Trafficking Conference” (hereinafter referred to as the conference). The conference was held for the first time three years ago, and this year is the third. It was changed to conduct online due to the pandemic. The purpose of the conference is to gather people from all parts of Asia who are concerned about human trafficking, and learn about it with other forms of modern slavery through various workshops, and know more about the latest anti-trafficking measures.

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Rescue Girls from Red Light Area of India during COVID-19 Lockdown

(Ayesha [centre], coordinator of CEDAR’s Nepalese partner, Asha Nepal)

 

(Updated on 9 October 2020)

   

Our Nepalese partner recently told us that they rescued two girls from a red light area of India. The situation of the girls was very vulnerable so our partner carried out rescue even under the threat of COVID-19 and closing of borders.

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From Sewing Sanitary Napkins to Three-layer Face Masks

(Theit Theit Shwee sewing face masks made by cloth [photo from CEDAR’s partner])

 

“Kacha…Kacha…” Theit Theit Shwee, a woman from the slum area of Myanmar, sat in front of a sewing machine and sewed the fabric. She carefully wrapped the two white bands and sewed them with the fabric and finished making a three-layer cloth mask. This has been her daily job, making cloth masks with other women in the community center of CEDAR’s partner.

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Refugees Get Schooling through TV – Cries of the Middle Eastern and Northern African Children

Editor’s note: The night always seems longer when you are looking forward to dawn. The bombs and gunfire in the warzone, the ruined houses and the perilous escape have been deeply imprinted on the minds of each refugee. Today, the world is experiencing the biggest refugee crisis since the World War II. In Syria alone, over half of the pre-war population has been forced to leave their homes. In this issue of SHARE, we will focus on Syrian refugee children, known as the “lost generation”, and how CEDAR’s partner utilises satellite television to help them improve their psychological health and advance their personal development. In “Back to the Bible”, Professor Ip Hon Ho Alex shared how structural sins can twist our values and what the Apostle Paul’s reminder means to us. In “Blessings by Offering”, we will call on believers to spread love and hope by helping Syrians to survive the bitter winter.

 

[“SHARE” JAN – MAR 2020 ] FOCUS 


Written by: Edward Lai (Senior Communications Officer)



The Syrian War has already been 8 years and it is still far from over. Chronic warfare resulted in uncountable casualties and destruction. More than 11 millions of civilians lost their homes, and were either displaced within the country or have fled to countries in the Middle East and North Africa to seek asylum, such as Lebanon, Turkey, and Jordan [1]. When their homelands are still devastated by conflicts, rebuilding their country seems impossible. How do these refugees live in neighbouring countries? Why are their children and other Middle Eastern and North African children described as the “lost generation”? While facing multifaceted challenges, how does this younger generation bear hope for the future? Kurt Johansen, executive director of SAT-7 Europe, Asia and Pacific, a partner of CEDAR, answered our questions one by one.

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