Children Ministry – Commitment and Collaboration

[“SHARE” JAN – MAR 2021 ] Join Hands Join Hearts

 

Written by Clara Chiu (Head of Partnership Development)

 

In order to transform the society, we first have to give children a chance to grow up healthily so that they can become leaders of good character who obey God’s will.

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The Real Meaning Behind “Seventy-seven Times”

[“SHARE” JAN – MAR 2021 ] BACK TO THE BIBLE

 

Written by: Bernard Wong (Assistant Professor (Theological Studies) and Associate Dean of China Graduate School of Theology, Board Member of CEDAR Fund)

 

If a Christian has been wronged, other believers often encourage her to offer forgiveness immediately, for Jesus teaches us to “forgive a brother seventy-seven times.” We may think that a good Christian should endure unfair treatment, and ought to be forgiving under all circumstances. Did Jesus really mean that?

 

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“Give You this Calf as a Mark of Reconciliation” – Road to Reconciliation after the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda

Editor’s note: Looking around the world, we can find that many people in developing countries have suffered from atrocities imposed by state authorities for power struggles. Every killing left all kinds of traumas on victims, making them impossible to look into the future. The “FOCUS” of this issue shares how CEDAR’s partner in Rwanda healed the trauma left over from the genocide against the Tutsi and engaged in community reconciliation work based on cultural traditions. “BACK TO THE BIBLE” explores the scriptural context of “Seventy-seven Times”, bringing out that forgiveness is the voluntary action of the victim, and seeking the truth is the basis for reconciliation. In addition, we share our children and youth development project that CEDAR has been supporting for many years in Zimbabwe.

 

[“SHARE” JAN – MAR 2021 ] FOCUS

 

Written by: Edward Lai  (Senior Communications Officer)

 

“I give you this calf as a mark of reconciliation” says Innocent, a survivor in the genocide in Rwanda.

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Rescue Girls from Red Light Area of India during COVID-19 Lockdown

(Ayesha [centre], coordinator of CEDAR’s Nepalese partner, Asha Nepal)

 

(Updated on 9 October 2020)

   

Our Nepalese partner recently told us that they rescued two girls from a red light area of India. The situation of the girls was very vulnerable so our partner carried out rescue even under the threat of COVID-19 and closing of borders.

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From Sewing Sanitary Napkins to Three-layer Face Masks

(Theit Theit Shwee sewing face masks made by cloth [photo from CEDAR’s partner])

 

“Kacha…Kacha…” Theit Theit Shwee, a woman from the slum area of Myanmar, sat in front of a sewing machine and sewed the fabric. She carefully wrapped the two white bands and sewed them with the fabric and finished making a three-layer cloth mask. This has been her daily job, making cloth masks with other women in the community center of CEDAR’s partner.

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The first sign of disaster has appeared: Cries of the Poor in Developing Countries during the Pandemic

Medical workers treated the sick after putting on their personal protective equipment (Photo from CEDAR’s partner)

Medical workers treated the sick after putting on their personal protective equipment (Photo from CEDAR’s partner)

 

“For poor places, [the spread of COVID-19] implies calamity.”

‘The Next Calamity’, The Economist, 28th March

 

Globalisation has made it impossible for any one country to avoid the risk of being affected by contagious diseases. When there is a pandemic, developed countries can still make use of their resources to procure pandemic prevention materials. They can also utilise their financial reserves to mitigate the impacts of the pandemic on their medical systems and economies.

 

For many poor and densely populated developing countries, their medical systems were already vulnerable even before the pandemic and there had always been a lack of social welfare. When this pandemic of the century strikes, its impact on societies and people’s livelihoods are disastrous, as noted by the Economist.

 

The reality is that the first sign of disaster has already appeared.

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